Biodynamic Farming in Maintaining Vegetable Gardens

Biodynamic Farming in Maintaining Vegetable Gardens

Biodynamic farming is one popular agriculture technique that is used by more and more farmers these days. It calls for organic and natural techniques to farming and maintaining health of plants and of course, the soil. Instead of investing in chemical sprays to keep vegetables healthy, there is a need to consider doing natural activities in doing so. Plucking pests and small insects that ruin vegetable leaves is one way.

There are numerous plant pests that you should prevent from thriving in your vegetable garden. For all you know, these pests are depriving your vegetable crops of the right and necessary nutrients and elements essential for growth and health. Your ultimate goal should always be to make your vegetable garden free from any of these pests:

Aphids – These are small, soft-structured insects feeding on vegetable growth tips and buds. They are responsible for making leaves curl and wither. These insects attack almost all kinds of vegetable crops. Insecticides are effective in killing and controlling them.  

Beetles – Yes, these insects can be interesting and appealing. They come in hard and colorful shells and at different sizes. They produce irregularly-shaped and unnecessary holes in the leaves of the plants. They can be controlled manually by picking out, though, this can be a tedious and nerve-wracking activity.  

Borer – These are insects responsible for wilting an entire vegetable plant. Borers can produce small holes in vegetables where wilting could uncontrollably begin. Borers usually attack melons, pumpkins and cucumbers. Controlling means there is a need for insecticides and for cutting affected parts or even destroying the whole plant.  

Cabbage worms – The name is misleading because cabbage worms are not actually worms. They are caterpillars and are thriving underneath the top leaves of cabbages. They produce holes in foliages, which can startup withering and malnutrition in the plant. They usually attack cabbage, cauliflower and broccoli.  

Cutworms – Like cabbage worms, cutworms are not technically worms. They are another kind of caterpillars. They can wilt an entire vegetable plant. To control their infestation, there is a need to cut off the plant at the base to prevent contagion. Cutworms usually affect pepper, tomato and cabbage.  

To correct any misconception and wrong beliefs, earthworms should not be included in the list of vegetable garden pests. That is because they actually are not. On the contrary, earthworms have been found to be helpful in making vegetable crops healthier and more disease and pest resistant.  

Earthworms help boost air and water circulation in the soil through their constant burrowing activities. When they do so, they even transport nutrients from the topsoil down to the subsoil where vegetable roots are. Worms eat decaying organic matters, breakdown chemicals and synthetics in the soil and excrete castings and slimes that further fertilize vegetable crops. This way, the creatures have been proven to be helpful in making plants stronger, healthier and more resistant to ailments and pests. Through controlling plant stress, pests are driven away.

If you want to make use of the effective biodynamic farming style in agriculture, you should learn to consider earthworms as your best friend. They may be creepy and disgusting in appearance, but they bring no harm, especially to your vegetable garden. Instead, they bring life.

Get more complete tips on Biodynamic Farming , visit: www.biodynamicfarming.getmytips.com

Planting a Vegetable Garden

Planting a Vegetable Garden

When planting vegetables, careful planning is the key to success. Before you even determine which seeds you’d like to plant, you must designate a space for your vegetable garden and come up with a detailed plan. Find the sunniest place in your yard and start there. If you don’t have a large enough plot for everything you’d like to grow, you may chose to construct raised planter beds. It is not unusual to grow vegetables in containers on patios, decks, or anywhere else with ample sunlight. A vegetable garden should receive about 6 hours of full sunlight a day. Many vegetables thrive under these conditions as the soil gets warm sooner and stays warm longer, promoting healthy growth. Raised beds also afford better drainage, as the water cannot flood the water logged plants and soil. This is important also when rain storms hit for drainage reasons.

Next, you need to consider the soil that you will grow your vegetables in. The soil should be fertile and provide the plants with plenty of vitamins and nutrients. You should add plenty of organic humus such as well composted manure. If you are re-cultivating in the same space as perhaps last year, there is not much to do but enrich the soil with additional organic materials as last years’ crop probably sucked most of the nutrients out. The soil should be light and airy, allowing the roots to develop in a healthy manner.

Draw out a schema for each and every seed. Take spacing into account as it’s very important. Some vegetables do not need much space to thrive while others need a lot. Some root shallow while some root deep. Take advantage of the knowledge you have of each specific seed and make better use of your space. If you plant a row of deep rooting vegetables, utilize the space between the seeds by planting shallow rooting plants. They will not get in the way of one another. Another thing to take into consideration is the direction your planter is facing. If you are planting a combination of crops, you will need to place them according to height so that the taller plants do not shade the shorter ones. Taller plants should be on the north side of the garden. As a general rule, rows of plants should run east to west. This will prevent those larger crops from shading the shorter ones.

Establish your walkways early so that you are not trekking through your garden, overly compressing the soil which can suffocate roots, or displacing seeds. Mark your beds well, noting what you are planting, when you planted and when you should expect sprouting seedlings.

Once you have developed a clear plan, you can start sowing. Use stakes and a piece of string to ensure straight rows. Place your seeds at the appropriate depth and plant extras. Not all will germinate and the extra seeds will cover the ones that do not. Firmly cover the seeds, creating a cocoon of moisture and water lightly, making sure not to disrupt the seeds or roots. Always keep the seedlings moist to ensure steady growth. When you see them sprout for the first time, be patient. Wait until they have sprouted two or three leaves before you prune. Let the roots develop before you prune which can put a bit of stress upon them.

If you’re planting during sweltering summer months, do it early in the morning or late in the evening, once the temperature has cooled off a bit. The heat can take a lot out of the plants, making the transition more stressful, leading to fewer thriving plants.

Again, planning is the key. A successful, fruitful garden depends on a few things:

1. Designate a sunny, well drained space for your vegetable planter.
2. Aerate and amend your soil with plenty of organic matter.
3. Draw a schema for your seeds, taking into account the height of the plant, the depth of the roots and the space needed around it.
4. Establish walkways so you do not damage root systems or overly compact soil.
5. Sow seeds in straight lines, taller plants on the north side of the planter.
6. Wait for the magic to happen and prune when necessary.
7. Enjoy homegrown vegetables!

When you taste the freshness of home grown sweet corn or vine ripened tomatoes on your family’s dinner table, you will know that all of the hard work was worth it. Home gardening is also a great way to spend time with your children, teaching them that hard work and diligence pays off directly with delicious homegrown vegetables.

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Setting Up Your Vegetable Garden

Setting Up Your Vegetable Garden

Vegetable gardening has lately become just as popular as going to the grocery store for your veggies. Vegetable gardening can produce a vegetable that are most of the times less expensive than when purchased in a grocery store, and vegetables from a home vegetable garden are without a doubt better tasting by far. Vegetable gardening is the same as growing herbs or flowers and if the right steps are taken and the young veggies are given the right care they’ll grow and evolve into very flourish vegetables.The First thing you will have to think about how much space you want to utilize for your vegetable garden and then choose a spot in your backyard, somewhere that has a good drainage, good flow of air, and good deep ground.

I bet you know that: vegetable gardens have a lot delightful rewards, a lot of animals, such as birds, mice, insects and many others will take a chance to take some of your vegetables. The method to prevent this is to setup a fence round your garden, or install a trap to snatch the moles, insects and other animals.Ahead of planting, “remember” the ground must be properly prepared. Good ground for vegetable gardening is accomplished by cultivation and the employment of organic fertilizer. The ground must be tilled to control weeds and mix mulch in the ground. Whenever you have a small garden, spading could be a more effective bet than plowing.

Mulching is also a all important part of ground preparation. Organic fertiliser added to the ground releases nitrogen, minerals, and supplemental nutrients plants need to grow. The most basic and most effective sort of mulch you can use is compost. While the type and amount of plant food used depends on the ground and the sorts of vegetables, there are a few plants that have particular needs; leafy plants, like cabbage, spinach, and lettuce typically grow better with  a good amount of nitrogen, when root crops such as potatoes, beets, and carrots ask more potassium hydroxide. Tomatoes and beans are accustomed to a smaller extent of the plant food, when plants like onions, celery, and potatoes need a bigger amount.

The Thing that’s vitally important in vegetable gardening is how the yard is ordered, there’s not a single plant that will grow in all gardens due to varying circumstances. The way to set up a vegetable garden is to plant vegetables demanding only a modest  distance together, such radishes, beets, and spinach, and those that need a lot of garden space together, such as maize, pumpkins, and potatoes. Attempt and plant big growing vegetables toward the back of the vegetable garden and the smaller ones in the front so that their sunshine doesn’t get blocked.

When you are finally done to begin planting out your vegetable garden, be sure that you plant at the right season. If you are eager to get an quick start, you may need to start your vegetable garden indoors in a hotbed and then move when the weather conditions allows it. Whenever you are done with planting, be sure your vegetables pick up the right amount of water, which depends up on the kind of plant or veggie.

Vegetable gardening is for many people a preferred sort of gardening since you can really taste the fruits of your work. Vegetable gardening isn’t that pricey to begin and the flavor of home grown vegetables definitely beat out the supermarket veggies.

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Fertilize Your Vegetable Garden With Natural Materials

Fertilize Your Vegetable Garden With Natural Materials

The easiest way to add beneficial nutrients to your vegetable garden is to buy bags of fertilizer at your local lawn and garden store. The problem with taking this simple route is that synthetic fertilizers contain chemicals. Some of these chemicals end up as runoff in our waterways, which is not very eco-friendly. Don’t forget that the chemicals will also end up in your vegetables. Synthetic fertilizers cost more because it takes more to do the job than organic fertilizers. And applying synthetic fertilizers actually kills many of the microorganisms the soil needs. Those are just some of the reasons why you should know how to fertilize your vegetable garden using natural materials.

Types of Common Organic Fertilizers

Organic fertilizer is “fertilizer that is derived from animal or vegetable matter,” according to Dictionary.com. You can buy bags of organic fertilizers. Check the labels to make sure there are no synthetic ingredients. You can also use other types of natural fertilizers to add nutrients to your vegetable garden. Plants primarily need a sufficient amount of nitrogen, phosphate and potassium to grow strong and healthy. Organic fertilizers contain at least one of these components, if not more.

Animal Manure

Chicken and horse manure are the most commonly used animal by-products, but you can also use cow, hog, sheep, rabbit and goat manure. Because fresh manure is loaded with nitrogen, you need to let it “age” before applying it to your vegetable garden. Check out the USDA’s manure management site for manure aging guidelines.

How Much Animal Manure To Use

How much manure your vegetable garden will need depends on the condition of the soil. As a general rule of thumb, use at least 25 pounds of cow, horse or hog manure per 100 square feet of garden space. To use chicken or sheep manure, you’ll need at least 12 pounds per 100 square feet. For rabbit and goat manure, use 10 to 12 pounds per 100 square feet. Apply the “aged” manure at least four weeks before planting your vegetable garden; it needs to be tilled into the soil.

Compost

Compost is another organic fertilizer that’s beneficial to your garden soil. Not only is it natural, but it adds nutrients and recycles waste at the same time. Since different materials add different nutrients, your compost should consist of a variety of materials such as used coffee grounds, tree leaves, pine needles, banana peels, fruit rinds, crushed eggshells, straw and grass clippings. Compost piles are basically layers of these materials. You need to keep the pile moist and turn it over occasionally. Once the materials have completely decomposed, which takes anywhere from a couple months to a year, they will be ready to fertilize your vegetable garden.

To use compost, another safe and eco-friendly method of fertilization, spread it over the soil at least three weeks before you plant. Use at least 25 pounds per 100 square feet of garden space.

Kassidy Emmerson is a writer for Yodle, a business directory and online advertising company. Find a gardener or more garden articles at Yodle Consumer Guide. Fertilize Your Vegetable Garden With Natural Materials

7 Different Kinds of Vegetable Garden Mulch

7 Different Kinds of Vegetable Garden Mulch

Using mulch in a vegetable garden has several benefits, all of which can be summed up by saying “they make gardening easier.” In this article I’m going to talk about 7 different kinds of mulch that are readily available and often much less expensive than the bark chips that are often sold in garden centers.

Vegetable Garden Mulch

1. Newspaper. Some people may be surprised to see this listed as a mulch. Yet when it is laid down first with a layer of a loose mulch on top it creates a nearly impenetrable barrier for weeds.

Use only the black newsprint with soy based ink, not the color printed paper most often used for ads.

2. Cardboard. This is similar to newspaper, it will also create a barrier for weeds. Adding a loose mulch on top of it will keep the cardboard from blowing away in the wind.

3. Grass Clippings. These are high nitrogen and can often be picked up from neighbors for free. Just sprinkle a one to two inch layer on top of the soil.

Make sure there wasn’t weed killer sprayed on the lawn recently. Lawn weed killer will kill most garden plants.

4. Straw. Just sprinkle a one to two inch layer on the soil.

5. Hay. This is similar to straw, only with more nitrogen, use a one to two inch layer.

One note about hay and straw. It is possible that the fields could have been treated with a weed killer that will kill most garden plants for up two years. The herbicides are called aminopyralid and clopyralid, if you can’t verify these chemicals weren’t used then don’t use the hay or straw on your garden.

6. Leaves. These are abundant during fall and can be used for the fall plants or just to cover bare beds over winter. A one to two inch layer will work well.

7. Black plastic. This is most often used for warming the soil in spring. If it goes through a winter it will become brittle and break into small pieces.

That’s 7 of the most common vegetable garden mulches. All of them are effective at conserving water and suppressing weeds, all but the plastic also add organic matter and nutrients to the soil as they break down.

If your interested in learning more about easy and effective methods of gardening then…

 

Click http://SecretsOfOrganicGardening.info

 

Brandon Wilkinson

Simple Steps to a GREAT Organic Vege Garden!

Simple Steps to a GREAT Organic Vege Garden!

Ever thought about gardening organically, but thought it was too hard? Growing vegetables organically is a healthy and satisfying way to garden, as can be cheaper than conventional gardening with chemicals and sprays.

The first step to building a successful organic vege garden is choosing the right location. Vegetables like shelter from the wind and full sun, and good drainage. It is also important to keep your garden close to a water supply, or within a hose-length. Planning out your garden on paper before you begin is also a good idea so you know what you want to plant, and where.

Preparing your soil:
The key to a successful organic garden is good soil. Ideally, it’s best to start with clean soil but if your soil is difficult or contaminated, then you can use raised vegetable beds to make sure your plants have the best start possible.

Most garden centers now sell a range of organic seeds, or you can buy seeds on line. There are also a number of heritage plants which are often disease resistant that you may want to consider.
To prepare the soil before planting, it is best to feed it with your home made fertilizers. If this will take too long then you can buy good, organic fertilizer in most garden shops. Add your fertilizer at least three weeks before planting to allow the fertilizer to fully break down and integrate into your soil.

Planting:
Most seed packets clearly show when to plant your seeds in the area in which you live, and how to care for your plants. It is best to follow these instructions to ensure a vigorous, thriving crop. If you plant your seeds outside their optimal growing period then they will either fail to germinate or bolt straight to seed, which is both disappointing and frustrating.

Irrigation:
Organic gardens need plenty of water as plants which are stressed through lack of water become vulnerable to disease. A thorough, soaking water every few days in summer should be sufficient to look after your plants, if you haven’t had rain. The water needs to penetrate the soil deeply to help the root structure develop deeply and vigorously. If you do not water the soil thoroughly the roots will reach for the moisture at the surface, creating weak, vulnerable plants.

Using organic mulch:
Organic mulch is an important aspect of gardening during summer as it helps protect the plants from water loss, and suppresses weeds. It also feeds your soil as it breaks down.

Hay, grass clippings and bark chips are all excellent mulches. It’s important however to make sure that if you use a permanent mulch like bark that your soil is not too damp in winter. This can cause your plants to rot and wither.

Pest Control:
While gardeners love the idea of growing organically, most worry about how to control pests. This is often a reason why many gardeners return to chemical controls for the garden. There are a range of organic pest control options that function well, including companion planting, home made organic pest sprays, manual maintenance and physical barriers.

These methods might require a little more effort from the gardener but they are tried and true, and cost effective to make.

If you follow the guidelines above you will be rewarded with flourishing, healthy and strong vegetables, free from chemicals and artificial sprays. And what could be better than that?

Fi McMurray is a garden enthusiast and author who has been gardening organically for 10 years. She has been involved with 2 award-winning gardens at the prestigious Ellerslie International Flower Show in Auckland, New Zealand.

Her latest book is “An Introduction to Successful Organic Gardening”, which joins her previous books “Successful Rose Gardening” and “Secrets to a Thriving Herb Garden”. You can find out more about Fi’s books at her website, www.fimcmurray.com

Fi lives north of Auckland, New Zealand, with her husband and two small children.

Food 4 Wealth – How To Grow Vegetables Quickly Review

Food 4 Wealth – How To Grow Vegetables Quickly Review

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Food 4 Wealth will show you how to grow vegetables quickly and how you can have a successful garden. With the help of this guide, you will be able to grow food anywhere in the world and eliminate much of your organic food bill cost. This guide has absolutely everything you need to know so you can grow healthy and fresh organic food without all the problems that most people face.

This guide features a method of growing organic food that is reliable and what the author claims to be as bomb proof. In this manner, you will be able to learn how you can grow an abundance of food without having to be confused with complex instructions. This package includes a fully illustrated step by step guide and more than 60 minutes of instructional videos.

If you are looking for an effective way to set up an organic garden, this guide is definitely for you. This guide will help you set up a garden that can produce more than what a traditional vegetable garden can by several times. It will also show you how you can set up a garden that only requires eight hours of light so your efforts can be lessened. It will also show you how you can have a garden that requires no digging, naturally repels pests, and has virtually no weeds.

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The Advantages Of Good Quality Topsoil for your Vegetable Garden

The Advantages Of Good Quality Topsoil for your Vegetable Garden

A couple of decades ago, growing your own vegetable garden was a very popular choice. Having your own vegetable garden then appeared to drop out of popularity for some time before becoming popular again in the noughties.

The most important component of any vegetable garden is the quality of the topsoil. A good topsoil will contain the components to help your vegetable garden to thrive. Selecting a good quality topsoil will help you grow a bigger and better crop of vegetables.

Understanding the make-up of good topsoil.

To be sure you’re using the right topsoil to do the job, it really is useful to understand what you are looking for in a topsoil. Perfect topsoil should have (hopefully) equal portions of sand, clay and silt. You should find an abundance of organic matter within your topsoil, along with worms. With all of these basic ingredients present you should have found quality topsoil, combined with the tips below, it is possible to achieve a thriving vegetable garden.

The quantity of organic matter within topsoil is specifically relevant to vegetable gardens as vegetable crops can absorb a huge amount of nutrients from the soil – this is provided for them from the high content of organic matter.

The living organisms which are contained within the soil are also specifically relevant to topsoil for vegetable gardens – you need spiders, protozoa, bacteria plus some fungi in there to offer your vegetable that edge they want to grow healthy.

To encourage the best possible vegetable you might like to help the topsoil a bit too. One of the ways would be to add mushroom compost to your topsoil. Another option is organic green compost, to aid your topsoil produce some fantastic quality vegetables, a perfect accompaniment to any Sunday roast.

Obviously, topsoil alone does not make a great vegetable garden! You’re going to need to put in some work yourself – the topsoil is the ground work so to speak!

•Make sure your chosen spot has plenty of sunlight!

•Be selective when you choose the vegetables to grow, ensure you are picking crops that are suited to the climate

•Take care of your veg – your topsoil can do the work if you are busy but you should put in some work yourself

In order to achieve that perfect vegetable garden, all you need is some effort and that important good quality topsoil.

This article was writtenand distributed on behalf of Boughton Loam & Turf Management, experts in Topsoil. For more information ,please visit www.gardentopsoildirect.co.uk

The Advantages Of Good Quality Topsoil for your Vegetable Garden

The Advantages Of Good Quality Topsoil for your Vegetable Garden

A couple of decades ago, growing your own vegetable garden was a very popular choice. Having your own vegetable garden then appeared to drop out of popularity for some time before becoming popular again in the noughties.

The most important component of any vegetable garden is the quality of the topsoil. A good topsoil will contain the components to help your vegetable garden to thrive. Selecting a good quality topsoil will help you grow a bigger and better crop of vegetables.

Understanding the make-up of good topsoil.

To be sure you’re using the right topsoil to do the job, it really is useful to understand what you are looking for in a topsoil. Perfect topsoil should have (hopefully) equal portions of sand, clay and silt. You should find an abundance of organic matter within your topsoil, along with worms. With all of these basic ingredients present you should have found quality topsoil, combined with the tips below, it is possible to achieve a thriving vegetable garden.

The quantity of organic matter within topsoil is specifically relevant to vegetable gardens as vegetable crops can absorb a huge amount of nutrients from the soil – this is provided for them from the high content of organic matter.

The living organisms which are contained within the soil are also specifically relevant to topsoil for vegetable gardens – you need spiders, protozoa, bacteria plus some fungi in there to offer your vegetable that edge they want to grow healthy.

To encourage the best possible vegetable you might like to help the topsoil a bit too. One of the ways would be to add mushroom compost to your topsoil. Another option is organic green compost, to aid your topsoil produce some fantastic quality vegetables, a perfect accompaniment to any Sunday roast.

Obviously, topsoil alone does not make a great vegetable garden! You’re going to need to put in some work yourself – the topsoil is the ground work so to speak!

•Make sure your chosen spot has plenty of sunlight!

•Be selective when you choose the vegetables to grow, ensure you are picking crops that are suited to the climate

•Take care of your veg – your topsoil can do the work if you are busy but you should put in some work yourself

In order to achieve that perfect vegetable garden, all you need is some effort and that important good quality topsoil.

This article was writtenand distributed on behalf of Boughton Loam & Turf Management, experts in Topsoil. For more information ,please visit www.gardentopsoildirect.co.uk

Raised Vegetable Garden Beds Are More Advantageous

Raised Vegetable Garden Beds Are More Advantageous

Raised beds are more advantageous than the normal beds is that since the plots are elevated the surface area available for plantation increases as compared to flat beds.


Also the soil in the raised beds is not compact because these beds are secluded and so no one walks on these beds. One more great advantage in raising the soil is the depth of that plot can be increased. The increase in depth of the soil can help plants that have long roots like carrot, beets and radishes to grow properly.


As these beds are raised they have a good draining capacity. It is beneficial to grow plants on raised beds especially in the winter season that is in cool climates. This is because when the soil is elevated a large portion of it is exposed to sunlight and hence can dry quickly and at the same time it can maintain warmth for a longer period.


The raised bed can increase the soil temperature by 8 to 13 degrees as compared to that of the soil at ground level. Thus in cool climates the excess moisture can be drained away quickly and the soil remains warmer.


The raised beds should not be more than four feet wide. Since such small plant is accessible from both the sides of the bed and there is no need to walk on such beds. If it is a larger area it is advisable to split the bed into smaller sizes for convenience.


Inside every bed it is not necessary to plant the crops in rows. They can be planted relatively close to each other to make the best utilization of the available space.


Raised vegetable growing is advantageous from the pest control point of view. The raised beds are generally secluded and are fenced by wooden fencing or a simple fence. But one can place the favorite food along with some germ killing medicine of these rodents, insects and other organisms at the fence itself.


Thus they cannot reach the vegetables and destroy them.

The raised types of beds also help in water conservation. The water irrigating systems are available for such raised beds. They supply water at the roots than on the leaves.


Thus this indirectly helps in preventing the diseases, which are caused due to wetting of the leaves of these vegetable plants. Nowadays special construction tips are available in books for designing these beds.


Even at home people can go for raised bed vegetable gardening by using small wooden blocks and raising its soil level suitably Since the raised beds have its distinct advantages people now prefer to raise the beds for vegetable growing by mounding the soil with the help of a shovel or rake.

For more interesting articles visit the authors article directory or if you are looking for Gardening Articles

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