Vegetable Garden Layout Ideas and Planning For a Very Small Garden

www.container-gardening-for-food.com Discussing and planning ways to getting the maximum yields of food from a tiny garden. Vegetable Garden Layout Ideas and Planning
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Planning on Growing Your Own Vegetables – Where to Start?

Planning on Growing Your Own Vegetables – Where to Start?

These days with large sites hard to come by and allotments much in demand, old gardeners or gardening junkies are no longer the sole exponents of GIY. No, many new entrants are young professionals, nature enthusiasts, people who are genuinely interested in getting closer to nature or reducing their dependency on mass market produce. Whilst others are experimenting by growing their own vegetables, almost like self sufficent micro farmers or even environmentalists, taking positive steps to reduce carbon footprint or better still growing for their own organic consumption and self satisfaction. Not surprising therefore to read in Press reports that the sale of vegetable seed has overtaken the sale of flower seed.

So if you are a potential GIYer and do intend starting a programme or project of growing your own vegetables, you might be interested in the following advice . So whether your motivation is to reduce air miles or taste organic food, there are some important points to consider when planning to start a vegetable garden.

Does size matter? No – not really, whether you have a pot, an old kitchen sink, a window sill or a sprawling site, growing your own vegetables is not only easy and exciting, it is also very rewarding.

Location – unless of course you enjoy longer walks through your garden, for practical reasons, the vegetable plot or kitchen garden should ideally be positioned nearer the house.
More importantly best to choose a position which permits the vegetable plot to enjoy a sunny aspect for much of the day. Although some vegetable produce will tolerate some shade (for example lettuce, runner beans etc), most won’t, so pick the site very carefully, pick a sunny and a sheltered position, avoid exposed windy sites. Other site aspects worth considering include picking a site where the prevailing ground conditions are level and free draining. Finally do bear in mind that good soil conditions will also be required, whether you prepare the ground by digging or mix in new soil or soil conditioners, most vegetables will require a growing depth of at least 300mm.

What to grow? Some might have favourites, some might stick with old reliable:
Potatoes are good, and probably one of the easiest to grow, they are also great at breaking down heavy soils. But do remember to give them plenty of water.
Leeks – easy to grow from seed and young leek tastes wonderful
Broad beans – very tasty when young but are very easy to grow
Sweetcorn – harvest when tassels are brown and boil in salted water
Radishes – many different varieties to choose from, but an ideal and fast growing crop from which to teach the children GIY
Runner Beans – quick growing, plentiful and pick and with lots of pick’n’grow fun

Deciding on the Layout – is important especially where space might be limited. For example you can grow some varieties at ground level whilst others such as French and Runner Beans can be trained to grow very effectively up trellising or bamboo canes. In larger sites, plan a series of long narrow beds which are easily accessible from both sides, but do remember to leave plenty of space between the growing beds, for example you should be able to move along pathways between beds with a wheelbarrow or more importantly if you like to get down on your hand and knees and get dirty, you’ll need at least 900mm – 1200mm spacing between the beds. Growing beds can be ground level on larger sites or raised on smaller sites or where soil conditions are poor. Raised beds can be developed using soil from other sites and mixing with compost, manures, soil conditioners etc. Also because they are raised you can ensure that drainage is good. As stated earlier, most vegetables prefer to grow in sunny areas, therefore it make sense to orientate beds on a north south axis, this ensures that all vegetable get sun each day. Be generous on spacing between beds, and consider a surface material so that all weather access is possible.

Ground Preparation – the better the soil, the better the performance, it is not impossible to provide good growing conditions. Vegetables require nutrients, water and oxygen. Soil plays a vital role in providing nutrients to plants. So it is important to prepare ground by digging to improve plants take up of nutrients. Alternatively if ground conditions are poor, you can use raised beds to provide better growing conditions for plants. In contrast to the ‘dig system’ the concept of using Raised Beds is sometimes referred to as the ‘No dig system’. Raised beds can be constructed from a variety of boards/timbers, recycled pallet boards, railway sleepers, pressure treated new sleepers, builder’s scaffolding boards all being popular choices.

Using crop rotation wisely – rotating the planting and growing of vegetables yields many benefits in terms of efficiency, bounty and disease/pest control. For example, Broccoli grows well in soils containing good levels of nitrogen, on the other hand, beans put nitrogen into the soil. Potatoes with the large canopy of foliage are very effective at suppressing weeds, whereas onions grow particularly very well in weed free soils. So from a crop rotational perspective, one would plant beans before of broccoli and potatoes before of onions.

Starting a rotation cycle – you should plan for at least three years, meaning the same vegetable will grow in the same spot every third year. However if you wish to also grow potatoes, better to use a four year rotation. The RHS has a very simple way to remember where each vegetable comes within the cycle: British Rail Late, where:

B = brassicas (cabbage, cauliflower, brussel sprouts, kale, turnips etc) was
R = roots (beetroot, parsnips, carrots)
L = legumes (peas, Broad bean, French bean, Runner bean, onions, garlic, chives)

How it works in practice is in area 1, you plant brassicas first year, roots in second year and legumes in third year. In area 2, you plant roots first year, legumes second year and brassicas third year. In area 3, you plant legumes first followed by brassicas and roots.

Maintenance – providing you have done good ground preparation, maintenance of the area shouldn’t be much more than adding a good fertiliser (Fish Bone & Blood) before planting or manure in Autumn. Watering is important especially during the early vulnerable stage, again bets done early in morning or late in evening and always check to make sure water is getting down to plant roots. Weed regularly to avoid unwanted competition for nutrients and water.

If at first you don’t succeed – try again. Sometimes it is only as a result of trial and error that you will discover what grows best for you in your area and conditions. Don’t be afraid to ask other local gardeners for tips or advice with particular problems, most of all, have fun in growing your own vegetables and join the burgeoning legion of GIY enthusiasts..

For more information, visit: http://www.owenchubblandscapers.com/news/entry/grow-it-yourself-where-to-start/

Professional garden designer and owner/manager of Dublin based landscaping company: ‘Owen Chubb Garden Landscapes Limited’.


Owen Chubb Garden Landscapes is an established and award winning garden landscaping company offering clients a complete landscaping service including Garden Design, Construction and Planting.


Owen Chubb Garden Landscapes Limited is a Full Member of the Association of Landscape Contractors of Ireland (ALCI), the only professional body for landscape contractors. We are proud winners in 2005 and 2006 of the prestigious ALCI Awards for BEST PRIVATE GARDEN Design and Construction.


For more information: www.owenchubblandscapers.com

Soil and Sun in Vegetable Garden Planning

Soil and Sun in Vegetable Garden Planning

Sun and Soil

Good vegetable garden planning requires that you meet two special requirements: sun and soil. Vegetables can be fussy and they are very specific about their sun and soil needs.

Sunshine Requirements

You must have a garden bed that receives a minimum of six hours of full sun each day. The more sun, the better your garden will be. Your harvest will be bigger and your vegetables will taste better. A garden that faces south and has good space between the rows (six inches or so) will generally produce a better crop.

What About Soil?

The other unbending requirement is good soil. You must have proper soil, but what is that? How do you know if your soil is good for a vegetable garden?

Fertile soil for the vegetable garden should be loose, brown dirt. It should shake easily through your fingers. It has to be rich in nutrients and organic matter. You may use commercial fertilizers or manure to enrich the soil. If you have a friend with a horse or two, offer to clean his stable. Horse manure is great fertilizer.

The soil should also be just a bit acidic. The pH should be about 6.5. A pH reading of seven means your soil is neutral. Any reading above seven means that it is alkaline and a lower number means acidic. You can pick up a cheap testing kit at your local nursery or home care store. If the soil is too alkaline, just add a little peat moss and work it into the soil. If it is too acidic, add lime.

Just a side note: flowers and flowering bushes require more alkaline soil than vegetables. While your flowers may bloom when planted against your vegetable garden, they will generally produce bigger flowers and more of them if the soil in which they are planted has a pH a little above 7. Having said that, there are certain flowers (marigolds, etc.) that you may want to put in among your vegetables to help ward off pests.

Call for Help

When in doubt, don’t hesitate to call your county agent or the manager at your local nursery. These folks have probably been active gardeners for a while and they can provide you with information specific to your area. What’s more, they will be delighted to help. Vegetable gardeners love to talk shop!

Good sun and soil can make all the difference in the success of your garden. Begin at the beginning with great vegetable garden planning and reap the rewards of your labor all summer long.

 

A guy has celery sticking out of one ear, lettuce out of the other, and a zucchini up his nose. He goes to the doctor and asks him what’s wrong. The doctor tells him, “Well, for one thing, you’re not eating right.”

 

I love that joke! If you like it too, you’ll also love the information we have at Vegetable Garden Planning.  You will find beautiful farm country and extras besides at Baldwin County AL Real Estate and Mobile Alabama Business Directory.  See us today!

Planning a Vegetable Garden

Planning a Vegetable Garden

Here’s all you need to know about starting your first home vegetable garden. Regardless of where one lives, growing conditions are bound to be different from the conditions described in most Gardening books. To plan a successful Garden, ask some questions. Which vegetables grow well in this area? What soil types are common? Are there unique conditions in the Garden to consider, for example, high winds, compacted soils, poor drainage and wet spots? Finally, what are the first and last frost dates and the growing season? Later as skills develop add more difficult Crops such as small fruits and perennial vegetables, and add more area to the Garden’s size. When selecting plants of a first garden, keep in mind several suggestions. So before I even get started the garden is already divided into four equal quadrants that are easy to identify and keep separated. When planning the layout of the vegetable beds there are four main considerations that I keep in mind to guide my planting and growing strategy. If you plant a particular crop or family of related crops in one raised bed the previous year, it goes in a different area or garden bed the next time around.

A very important consideration when planning your vegetable garden is to think about the size, height, and growth habit of the crops and to plant according to these characteristics. Getting this right will enable you to employ succession planting techniques to grow two or three separate harvests in the same space that many gardeners grow a single vegetable crop. When the bulbs are harvested in mid summer the bed can then be used to plant fall crops such as kale, mustard greens, cabbage, broccoli, and other cool weather vegetables and planning ahead the same area can be used to grow tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants can be replanted with your crop of fall garlic. In September after the tomatoes have slowed production, pull the vines, add a layer of compost to the bed and use the area to plant garlic to over-winter, or sow transplants of other fall and winter vegetables. There are many unique vegetable varieties available that are not only tasty, but can also add an ornamental flavor to the vegetable garden with their unusual shapes, textures, and colors. There are several factors to consider when planning what will be grown in the vegetable garden.

Growing from seed gardeners should consider whether they are willing and able to grow any of their plants from seed under fluorescent lights. In cooler climates, starting seeds indoors helps to extend the growing season and provides the gardener with more control over what specific varieties of tomatoes, peppers, beans and other vegetables will be cultivated. When planning the vegetable garden, decide which plants will be grown from seed, and which plants will be purchased as seedlings. Gardeners who grow vegetables may also enjoy growing fruit in the garden. Planting a fruit tree such as apple, pear or cherry is also a satisfying addition to the vegetable garden. Gardeners tend to neglect the plants they don’t like to eat. To avoid being wasteful, gardeners should grow only those edible plants that are regularly eaten in their household. Although most vegetable plants grow in varying shades of green, some heirloom vegetables grow in a wide variety of colors. Incorporating edible flowers such as nasturtiums or violas also adds a touch of color to the vegetable garden. When planning the next seasons vegetable patch, gardeners will also need to consider the time and energy they have available to spend working to maintain the garden, as well as any storage space required once the baskets of fruit and vegetables begin to be harvested. Sunlight full sun is the preferred exposure for growing most vegetables. Install your beds away from trees or other objects that could shade the garden. Remember that trees are plants too and locating garden beds too close to tree roots will place your vegetables in competition with trees for water and nutrients.

 Windbreaks trees, fences, walls, even hedges can be used to protect young plants, as long as they are far enough away from your garden not to cause shade or competition problems. The size of your garden depends on the vegetable needs and wants of you and your family, what land is available to you, water requirements, and how hard your want to work at it. Many people enthusiastically plant gardens larger than their needs and their abilities to care for them, and then realize, late into the season, that their vegetable garden has just gotten away from them. Spinach, radishes, leaf lettuce and other like vegetables need relatively little space. There are new bush varieties that are constantly being developed for these types of plants that can be used in small gardens. Placement if you are planting corn in your garden, plant it on the north side, so it wont shade other plants as it grows taller. Map your garden when your deciding what goes where, so next year, you can rotate some crops. Successful garden all deepens on you and your planning so get started on your new garden. For more information on gardening go to www.Teegoes.org

Timothy Samuel I live in Wilmington,De enjoy writing on many topics from food to travleing. And you hope my articles be enjoyable and helpfull to all.

Planning your Organic Garden – Step by Step

Planning your Organic Garden – Step by Step

Where to start when growing organics. Often we can be overwhelmed at the beginning of a project – there is simply so much to think about and consider. If starting from scratch, then you actually have a great opportunity to plan and lay out your garden in an attractive, logical way with plenty of room to consider the needs of wildlife, as well as the usual garden requirements such as pathways, seating and utility areas. They key is to be methodical as you consider the various elements of your garden, and what you want to achieve from each one.

Unfortunately, however, not many of us are starting from a greenfield site. So this article is intended to help you identify the main areas to consider in an organic garden, and how best to integrate them into your existing garden layout.

Kitchen Gardens:
Growing your own vegetables is not only healthy and satisfying, it has also become very popular. I would recommend, if you can, that you put some space aside in your garden to grow your own fruits and vegetables.

There are a number of ways to set about this. If you have decent soil, then you can add organic fertilizers and compost to condition the soil before planting. If your soil is fairly dismal, you suffer from impaired mobility or you just like to move things along more quickly, then raised beds may suit you better. A section of your garden in raised beds can look very attractive, remain tidy and be extremely productive year round.

There are a number of issues to consider, when choosing an area for your vegetables. Ideally you want an area sheltered from wind. Vegetables also need full sun for most of the day, and you will save your legs if you plant your vegetables close to a water source and within a hose-length.

Organic gardens are particularly reliant on wildlife and ‘good’ bugs, so including plants and flowers which are attractive to wildlife can be helpful. Bird baths or feeding stations are also worth considering, as they bring a range of birds into the garden.

Flower Beds:
Flowers are an important element in the organic garden. Not only do they encourage the ‘good’ bugs into the garden, they also act as decoys for the ‘bad’ bugs that can decimate fruits and vegetables. Flowers can (and should) be integrated into your organic kitchen garden, but most gardeners also enjoy a range of flowering plants throughout their garden, purely for their aesthetic value.

The key to growing flowers successfully in the organic garden is to choose plants that suit your soil and environment. In other words, local plants. Plants that are well adapted to the local conditions will grow more readily, be healthier and therefore more disease resistant.

If you are determined to grow flowers that are not naturally suited to your soil type, then raised beds are, once again, the way to go.

Utility Areas:
An organic garden has a few more requirements from its utility areas. A compost bin and worm farm are both helpful as they create useful organic fertilizer for your garden. They also help to cut down on the green waste from you home.

You are more likely to add your green waste to your compost bin and worm farm if they are easily reached, on pathways free from mud. However they are also not the most attractive of things, and you probably won’t want them to be easily visible. It is worth noting that a well maintained compost bin or worm farm should not smell. If there is an odor coming from your bins this is an indication that it is not in balance, and needs some attention.

Seating:
Organic gardens can be very attractive and you may wish to give some thought to your seating areas. A dining table in the middle of your kitchen garden can work very well, and is a great discussion point when you have guests. It is also handy to have somewhere to rest while you are working in your garden!

If you are lucky enough to have large trees in your garden, then seats, tables or chairs under the canopy are a very relaxing place to sit.

These are just a few of the basics you may want to consider when planning your garden. If you take some time at the beginning, even though this is not the most exciting part of gardening, to plan properly, it will make your garden a far more enjoyable place to be.

Fi McMurray is a garden enthusiast and author who has been gardening organically for 10 years. She has been involved with 2 award-winning gardens at the prestigious Ellerslie International Flower Show in Auckland, New Zealand.

Her latest book is “An Introduction to Successful Organic Gardening”, which joins her previous books “Successful Rose Gardening” and “Secrets to a Thriving Herb Garden”. You can find out more about Fi’s books at her website, www.fimcmurray.com

Fi lives north of Auckland, New Zealand, with her husband and two small children.

Planning your Organic Garden – Step by Step

Planning your Organic Garden – Step by Step

Where to start when growing organics. Often we can be overwhelmed at the beginning of a project – there is simply so much to think about and consider. If starting from scratch, then you actually have a great opportunity to plan and lay out your garden in an attractive, logical way with plenty of room to consider the needs of wildlife, as well as the usual garden requirements such as pathways, seating and utility areas. They key is to be methodical as you consider the various elements of your garden, and what you want to achieve from each one.

Unfortunately, however, not many of us are starting from a greenfield site. So this article is intended to help you identify the main areas to consider in an organic garden, and how best to integrate them into your existing garden layout.

Kitchen Gardens:
Growing your own vegetables is not only healthy and satisfying, it has also become very popular. I would recommend, if you can, that you put some space aside in your garden to grow your own fruits and vegetables.

There are a number of ways to set about this. If you have decent soil, then you can add organic fertilizers and compost to condition the soil before planting. If your soil is fairly dismal, you suffer from impaired mobility or you just like to move things along more quickly, then raised beds may suit you better. A section of your garden in raised beds can look very attractive, remain tidy and be extremely productive year round.

There are a number of issues to consider, when choosing an area for your vegetables. Ideally you want an area sheltered from wind. Vegetables also need full sun for most of the day, and you will save your legs if you plant your vegetables close to a water source and within a hose-length.

Organic gardens are particularly reliant on wildlife and ‘good’ bugs, so including plants and flowers which are attractive to wildlife can be helpful. Bird baths or feeding stations are also worth considering, as they bring a range of birds into the garden.

Flower Beds:
Flowers are an important element in the organic garden. Not only do they encourage the ‘good’ bugs into the garden, they also act as decoys for the ‘bad’ bugs that can decimate fruits and vegetables. Flowers can (and should) be integrated into your organic kitchen garden, but most gardeners also enjoy a range of flowering plants throughout their garden, purely for their aesthetic value.

The key to growing flowers successfully in the organic garden is to choose plants that suit your soil and environment. In other words, local plants. Plants that are well adapted to the local conditions will grow more readily, be healthier and therefore more disease resistant.

If you are determined to grow flowers that are not naturally suited to your soil type, then raised beds are, once again, the way to go.

Utility Areas:
An organic garden has a few more requirements from its utility areas. A compost bin and worm farm are both helpful as they create useful organic fertilizer for your garden. They also help to cut down on the green waste from you home.

You are more likely to add your green waste to your compost bin and worm farm if they are easily reached, on pathways free from mud. However they are also not the most attractive of things, and you probably won’t want them to be easily visible. It is worth noting that a well maintained compost bin or worm farm should not smell. If there is an odor coming from your bins this is an indication that it is not in balance, and needs some attention.

Seating:
Organic gardens can be very attractive and you may wish to give some thought to your seating areas. A dining table in the middle of your kitchen garden can work very well, and is a great discussion point when you have guests. It is also handy to have somewhere to rest while you are working in your garden!

If you are lucky enough to have large trees in your garden, then seats, tables or chairs under the canopy are a very relaxing place to sit.

These are just a few of the basics you may want to consider when planning your garden. If you take some time at the beginning, even though this is not the most exciting part of gardening, to plan properly, it will make your garden a far more enjoyable place to be.

Fi McMurray is a garden enthusiast and author who has been gardening organically for 10 years. She has been involved with 2 award-winning gardens at the prestigious Ellerslie International Flower Show in Auckland, New Zealand.

Her latest book is “An Introduction to Successful Organic Gardening”, which joins her previous books “Successful Rose Gardening” and “Secrets to a Thriving Herb Garden”. You can find out more about Fi’s books at her website, www.fimcmurray.com

Fi lives north of Auckland, New Zealand, with her husband and two small children.

Planning the Organic Vegetable Garden

Planning the Organic Vegetable Garden

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Special tips on Planning a Raised Bed Vegetable Garden

Special tips on Planning a Raised Bed Vegetable Garden

If you are planning a raised bed vegetable garden, you will need to keep a few things in mind in order to get the best results.

Here are six easy tips to remember when planning your very own raised bed vegetable garden.

1) Plan your garden in such a way that allows for adequate flexibility in respect to space and the possibility for more raised beds.

If you do this, you will easily be able to make any possible changes when the time comes without having to start over from the beginning.

2) Plan your garden so that the beds are separate. Joint beds may be tempting because they look attractive, but they can create future difficulties when moving around.

If you do this, watering, harvesting, and cleaning, among other tasks, can be performed without difficulty due to the space between the beds.

3) The plan for your garden should use only the best materials because, due to the raised bed, the initial costs of the material will balance out.

Therefore, you don’t have to settle for the cheaper, less durable woods, such as pine when building your garden. Instead, you can contribute stone or cedar to your garden because they will last longer.

4) Allow for the best amount of sunlight and water to reach your plants every day.

Most vegetables require plenty of light, but this is not the case for all the plants you may find in your garden.

All your vegetables are going to need adequate water, but too much water can harm the roots. Make sure you have a proper drainage system to prevent this.

5) Take the time to consider which plants you want to be a part of your garden because otherwise you may feel as if you didn’t make the most of your efforts.

Knowing the average maturity period for your plants and chalking that out for each of the beds will allow you to plan the next plants accordingly.

6) Although most of the raised bed vegetable gardens require transportation of the soil, consider using synthetic soil mixed with fertilizer. If you chose to do so, natural fertilizers, such as compost, will be your best choice.

With compost, the plants in your garden will have access to all the nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorus, they will need.

Other organic matter such as grass also enhances your garden because it increases the efficiency of the soil resulting in a much richer harvest.

 

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Vegetable Garden Planning

Vegetable Garden Planning

Crops flourish with 7 organic vegetable garden advantages of mushroom compost. Usually containing coconut hulls, hay, corn cobs, cottonseed meal, poultry dung and straw horse bedding, the pure compost is dark, rich and odorless.

1 ) completely recycled

This compost is the discarded after mushrooms have grown in it. Fresh compost can only be used once to grow mushrooms, so that the used or spent compost must be disposed of. One fantastic way to reuse these’leftovers’ is to nourish your vegetable garden. Considered a replaceable alternative option to peat moss, recycled compost can also help save the peat bogs’ delicate ecological balance.

Come visit us right here for more Gardening and Gardener Info and get a bunch of great Gardening Ebooks Vegetable Garden Plants. http://www.magnoliatreeearthcenter.org

Just like regular ecological garden compost, microbial activity is formed as it breaks down, making humus. Remember that all organics continue to break down. After a few months you could need to add a top layer to container plants. out of doors application is predicted to last two to five years.

3 ) Drought resistant

Compost conserves moisture to plants by augmenting the capacity to hold water, while aerating the soil at the same time. The fungal activity of previous mushroom growing creates a wet barrier against drought and sealing heat. This is glorious for vegetable gardens by improving soil structure and saving water costs, especial in arid zones.

4 ) Controls Garden Pests

Mushroom compost is organic matter that creates good microbial action. Profitable microbes in turn inspire beneficial insects, earth worm activity and discourage illnesses.

Since spent mushroom compost used to host mushrooms, it is brim-full of this good fungus and reports abound about amazing plant expansion. Naturally low in nitrogen, mushroom compost doesn’t inspire over leafy expansion, making it excellent for flower bearing plants like vegetables.

This makes perfect mulch for vegetable and flower gardens, trees, plants and top dressings for existing gardens.

7 ) pleasant smelling

Properly made and stored, this compost doesn’t smell bad. Actually, it has a nearly sweet smell when fresh. Even that odor quickly dissipates once put in the ground. No longer will your neighbors shoot you dirty looks for growing organic. If spent mushroom compost has a nasty odour, don’t use it unless you re-compost.

Come visit us right here for more Gardening and Gardener Info and get a bunch of great Gardening Ebooks Vegetable Garden Plants. http://www.magnoliatreeearthcenter.org
.

Come visit us right here for more Gardening and Gardener Info and get a bunch of great Gardening Ebooks Vegetable Garden Plants.
http://www.magnoliatreeearthcenter.org

Vegetable Plants